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With two little ones, the need for a child’s table was needed for many reasons, but came in handy for more occasions than I imagined when I made it…

It was a tea party’s table’s table for my toddler, keeping her occupied while I cleaned and vacuumed. She frequently opted for a more casual attire of cat ears and footie pajamas despite a rack of dressier clothes behind her :-)

It periodically got moved to our garden room for birthday parties so that little girls could sit comfortably and enjoy refreshments.

And it provides ample space for working on school projects, like dioramas and posters.

Although not applicable for us, as we go to my mother-in-law’s house, it would make a great children’s table for Thanksgiving. Best yet – it is completely customizable.

My table is 4 feet x 8 feet, which, not so coincidentally, is the size of a piece of plywood.

Materials I used:

  • One sheet of plywood, 4′ x 8′ x 3/4″ ($20)
  • 24′ of 3/4″ wide trim ($12)
  • Four 21″ table legs ($28 total)
  • 20′ of (1″x4″) board
  • Small nails
  • Wood putty (to fill nail holes)
  • Sander
  • Drill and screws
  • Primer/paint – OR – stain
  • Four straight leg top plate and screws, pictured below for reference ($6 total)

Straight leg top plate, $1.50/each

21″ table legs, $7/each

3/4″ wide trim that I used to cover plywood edges, $.46/ft.

Directions

  • Measure 6″ in from the width and length of all the corners and screw in leg top plates to the plywood
  • Screw in all four legs
  • Measure between each leg separately (despite your best efforts, sometimes they may vary a little) and cut the 1″ x 4″ to length
  • Drill a pilot hole, then attach the boards to the legs with screws
  • Cut four pieces of 1″ x 4″ about 6″ inches in length with 45 degree angles at the ends *
  • Drill a pilot hole, then attach these angled pieces to the apron

* You can also buy a metal piece (similar to this) if you aren’t comfortable with cutting angles

  • Sand the top of the plywood
  • Measure the lengths and widths of plywood carefully
  • Cut trim pieces with the ends mitered at 45 degree angles to cover the plywood edges
  • Nail the trim to the edges of the plywood and fill the holes
  • Prime, sand and paint – or – stain

This table cost us $66 (I listed what we had to buy, the rest we had) and we use it constantly. Play tables frequently go for $200-$500, so you can’t beat that price!

There are so many possibilities too:

Add a paper roll for an additional $12.

Lego obsessed? Add Lego boards

(Speaking of, here’s a way to make a Lego play table that requires no construction for kids with a more serious Lego addiction.)

Paint the top with chalkboard paint, cut out a circle in the middle and sink a container for chalk.

Make it a musical station by installing xylophones and (if your ears can tolerate it) objects for your children to drum on.

Make it out of a white board instead of plywood

You could also:

  • Add a lazy Susan
  • Cut holes for pencil, crayon and marker holders
  • Stencil the top with designs
  • Paint on a checker board, scrabble board, car tracks, etc….

It was super easy to make and, by using different legs, different tables can be made, like a coffee table. I’m working on instructions for the “baby sleeping” sign and hope to have those ready soon :-)

I hope you like the table and are able to use it in your home :-)

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